SILVER DENARIUS OF L. HOSTILIUS SASERNA, 48 BC.

SILVER DENARIUS OF L. HOSTILIUS SASERNA, 48 BC.

395.00

Obverse: Head of a female Gallic captive facing right, with dishevelled hair, carnyx behind.

Reverse: L HOSTILIVS SASERNA, Statue of Diana (Artemis) facing, with stag and spear.

RRC: 448/3. Sear: 419. CRR: 953. RSC: Hostilia 4. [Rome, 8 BC].

Diameter: 19 mm. Weight: 3.8 g.

A superb and very rare silver denarius struck by the moneyer L. Hostilius Saserna in 48 BC, a year after civil war had broken out between Caesar and Pompey. A close ally of Julius Caesar, Saserna designed this coin to commemorate Caesar’s recent military victories in Gaul. The obverse is generally regarded to depict Gallia, the personification of the recently conquered province. The presence of a Carnyx (Gallic war trumpet) behind her head certainly supports this interpretation, but she could simply be a generalised representation of a female Gallic captive. The reverse probably relates to Caesar’s capture of the Greek city of Massalia (modern day Marseille) in the early stage of the civil war, this being suggested by the image of an archaic statue of the Ephesian Artemis. This deity was held in special reverence by the Greek citizens of Massalia and the city possessed a splendid temple erected in honour of the goddess. A beautiful example of this highly sought after and fascinating type, steeped in historical connections. Good detail with areas of iridescent toning.

Add To Cart